EJCAP Online 22(4), December 2012, English

16 Global and European News

16 Global and European News

Click here to read more about last year's winners

Click here to download the application forms and detailed rules from the ABCD web site

Applications invited for the

Young Scientist Awards 2013

The European Advisory Board on Cat Diseases(ABCD)invites applications for the 2013 ABCD & Merial Young Scientist Clinical and Research Awards (AMYSA), which aim to reward innovative and outstanding work by promising young professionals in the field of feline infectious diseases and/or immunology. Two awards will be presented, one for research, the other for basic clinical investigation. The jury will decide to which category a submission should be assigned.

Candidates should have made an original contribution to the field of feline infectious diseases and/or immunology, which has been published or accepted for publication in a referenced journal (PubMed, Web of Science, Web of Knowledge), or accepted by another assessing body (e.g. a Thesis Committee) in 2011 or later.

Candidates should be based in Europe (EU or EFTA country), have completed a veterinary or biomedical curriculum, and be 35 years of age or younger.

Applications should be made in English in an electronic format and include a short abstract (max. 500 words) of the work the applicant wishes to submit, as well as a short curriculum vitae and two personal references. Any relevant publications and/or dissertation on the topic should be included. The deadline for submission is 1 January 2013.

The awards (1000 each) are funded by Merial and will be presented by the ABCD at the congress of the International Society of Feline Medicine, to be held from 26-30 June 2013 in Barcelona (Spain). The award winners will receive a complimentary registration to this congress. Return travel expenses and accommodation will also be covered to allow the laureates to attend the event. The winners are expected to give a short presentation or present a poster of their findings at this event.

The recipients of the Clinical and Research AMYSA 2012 were Bianca Stützer (Munich University, Germany) and Céline Robert-Tissot (Zurich University, Switzerland), respectively.

Michael Day, chairman of the WSAVA One Health Committee

WSAVA calls for global monitoring

of pet diseases

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) One Health Committee has called for a co-ordinated global infectious disease monitoring system to be established for veterinarians who work in small companion animal practice worldwide, following a new study published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

The study, led by Michael Day, Professor of Veterinary Pathology in the School of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Bristol, lists the key zoonoses between pets and their owners. Authors of the paper are members of the WSAVA One Health Committee, which is an independent advisory group that receives financial support through the WSAVA Foundation.

It recommends that the knowledge gained through surveillance would permit more effective global control of small companion animal zoonoses and reduce the risks inherent within this most fundamental of human relationships.

Commenting, Professor Michael Day said: “It is well recognised that most of the major new diseases of mankind will have an animal origin and that dogs and cats are a potential source of such ‘emerging diseases’. The number of small companion animals is particularly significant. For example there are an estimated eight to ten million dogs living in up to 31% of UK homes and in the USA, 72 million dogs in 37% of homes. The benefits of pet ownership on human health, well-being and development are unquestionable but, as they have moved from the barn, to the house, to the bedroom, the potential for disease spread to humans increases. Control of diseases among dogs and cats is a good way to prevent spread to humans.”

In human, livestock and wildlife heath there are already programmes of active surveillance for infectious disease underway to monitor the global distribution and movement of key infectious agents. For example, the WHO monitors human influenza virus infection through a network of 111 centres in 83 countries. In contrast, there is no such monitoring for the infections that may be transmitted between small companion animals and man. Meanwhile, canine rabies virus infection, one of the diseases listed in the paper, is estimated to kill a minimum of 55,000 people in Africa and Asia each year.

He concluded: “The development of such a scheme would require the significant political will, scientific application and financial support that could be achieved through a public-private partnership. The aim of our position paper in Emerging Infectious Diseases is to initiate stakeholder discussions with that end goal in mind.”

Paper: Surveillance of zoonotic infectious diseases transmitted by small companion animals, Day M J, Breitschwerdt E, Cleaveland S, Karkare U, Khanna C, Kirpensteijn J, Kuiken T, Lappin MR, McQuiston J, Mumford E, Myers T, Palatnik-de-Sousa CB, Rubin C, Takashima G, Thiermann A. Emerging Infectious Diseases, volume 18, issue 12, December 2012. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/18/12/12-0664_article.htm

SUMMARY

Feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC) is the most common cause of feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD). This retrospective, case-controlled study evaluated possible risk factors associated with FIC and compared different clinical presentations in 64 cats with FIC. Several risk factors known to be involved in FLUTD were identified as playing a role in FIC. Of the stressful situations considered, most did not occur with increased frequency in cats with FIC compared to controls, except for a house move. The presence of pyuria, haematuria and an increased urine protein:creatinine ratio were significantly higher in obstructed males compared with non-obstructed males. An obstruction was significantly more likely in cats with struvite crystalluria compared with cats without struvite crystalluria. These findings suggest that urethral plugs might be an important cause or contributing factor of obstruction in FIC. Episodes of FIC seem to occur mainly in susceptible cats in combination with a deficient environment.

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Volume 22(4), December 2012 SPECIAL ISSUE

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Young Scientist

Awards 2013

The European Advisory Board on Cat Diseases(ABCD)invites applications for the 2013 ABCD & Merial Young Scientist Clinical and Research Awards (AMYSA), which aim to reward innovative and outstanding work by promising young professionals in the field ...

Michael Day, chairman of

the WSAVA One Health Committee

WSAVA calls for global monitoring of pet diseases

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) One Health Committee has called for a co-ordinated global infectious disease monitoring system to be ...

Global and European News